YOUR Identity

How can I protect myself from ID theft?

  • Never provide personal financial information, including your Social Security number, account numbers or passwords, over the phone or the Internet if you did not initiate the contact. E-mails created by scammers may look exactly like the real thing and may contain viruses that can contaminate your computer.
  • Never click on the link provided in an e-mail you believe is fraudulent.
  • Do not be intimidated by an e-mail or caller who suggests dire consequences if you do not immediately provide or verify financial information.
  • If you believe the contact may be legitimate, contact the financial institution yourself. You can find phone numbers and Web sites on the monthly statements you receive from your financial institution, or you can look the company up in a phone book or on the Internet and contact them directly.
  • Never provide your password over the phone or in response to an unsolicited Internet request. A financial institution would never ask you to verify your account information online. Thieves armed with this information and your account number can help themselves to your savings.
  • Review account statements regularly to ensure all charges are correct. If your account statement is late in arriving, call your financial institution to find out why. If your financial institution offers electronic account access, periodically review activity online to catch suspicious activity.
  • If you fall victim to an attack, act immediately. Alert your financial institution. Place fraud alerts on your credit files. Monitor your credit files and account statements closely.
  • Report suspicious e-mails or calls to the Federal Trade Commission through the Internet at www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/, or by calling 1-877-IDTHEFT.

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